Computer Love

A-

When we think about “science fiction”, we typically think of two things: cerebral scifi, like the Twilight Zone, which uses speculative settings and concepts to delve deeper into the human condition; and pulp scifi, like Star Trek, which uses speculative settings and concepts as an excuse to blow things up. Sometimes a writer will try to achieve both, occasionally one thinks it’s the other, and rarely a work will effectively unite the two aspects of the genre, but overall, this dichotomy of “thinky” scifi and “explodey” scifi tends to remain unquestioned. What would – what could – science fiction that didn’t fit into either category even look like?

Iothera

B+

When I first started Yes Homo, I had vague ideas about keeping it kid-friendly, the sort of thing a guidance counsellor or gay aunt could recommend to a kid. That’s pretty obviously out the window at this point, given that a quick look at my reading list turns up nine links marked “nsfw”, some of which are literally pornography. I’ll defend my inclusion of these to anyone, though, because works of an explicitly sexual nature need good queer and trans representation too. I do still want to keep Yes Homo work-safe though, so you won’t find any nudity under the cut.

Dicebox

A+

Some stories need to be told twice. Truly skilled writers can create worlds so rich, plots so intricate, and characters so deep that you can’t take them all in with just one telling; each subsequent reading reveals new details that you never noticed before. Other stories are simply too convoluted, or lack exposition, to fully understand what’s happening without a reread. Still others are just so enjoyable that they never get old, and multiple passes endear them closer to your heart.